Category Archives: Animation

Why Our Partners Drive Us Mad: Philosopher Alain de Botton to the Central Foible of the Human Heart and How to Heal It


“We believe we are seeking happiness in love, but what we are really after is familiarity.” “To love without knowing how to love wounds the person we love,” wrote the great Zen teacher Thich Nhat Hanh in his treatise on mastering the art of loving. But not knowing how to be loved equally wounds us, and wounds those who try to love us. Philosopher Alain de Botton has devoted the lion’s share of his life to exploring the complex psychoemotional machinery that, despite our best intentions, inflicts the wounds of love upon us and our partners. Decades after Willa Cather termed romantic relationships “the tragic necessity of human life,” De Botton writes in The Course of Love (public library) — his stunning meditation on the … Read the rest

10 Learnings from 10 Years of Brain Pickings, Animated


“Allow yourself the uncomfortable luxury of changing your mind.” When Brain Pickings turned ten, I looked back on my ten most significant learnings from this decade of reading, writing, and living. I remain immensely grateful for the warm and wonderful notes of appreciation I received in response to the piece. Among them was a particularly touching gift from Melbourne-based reader Alex Sandalis, who was moved to lend his artistic talent and his beautiful voice to illustrating and narrating this animated adaptation: The full piece resides here. donating = lovingBringing you (ad-free) Brain Pickings takes me hundreds of hours each month. If you find any joy and stimulation here, please consider becoming a Supporting Member with a recurring monthly donation of your choosing, between a cup … Read the rest

How 3D Printing Is Revolutionizing Stop Motion Animation

“In an age of countless computer-generated box office hits coming out of Pixar, Disney and Dreamworks, many had feared that traditional styles of animation like stop motion would become obsolete. But small studios like LAIKA have proven that stop motion animated films are not only commercially viable, but is an art form that’s still evolving, thanks to 3D printing, and some incredibly talented animators. Films like the recently released “Kubo and the Two Strings” show how 3D printing is enabling animators to push the boundaries of stop motion animation.”… Read the rest

Watch Animations of Two Italo Calvino Stories: “The False Grandmother” and “The Distance from the Moon”

Source:
Open Culture



Excerpt:
“There are those books we go to not to escape this world, but to experience the truth of a mysteriously attributed quote, “There is another world, and it is this one.” That is to say that the worlds we find in certain novels are no less filled with dread, ambiguity, and moral freight than our own. But these sorts of stories offer new maps for reality. They may at first be those of the Protestant theology and Victorian morality of C.S. Lewis, whose Narnia books (available in a free audio format here) rather literally give us another world in this one. But we may soon find ourselves catapulted into the neurotic nightmares of Kafka, the sci-fi paranoia of Philip … Read the rest

Spike Jonze’s Stop Motion Film Hauntingly Animates Paris’ Famed Shakespeare and Company Bookstore

Source:
Open Culture



Excerpt:
“Since his breakout early days directing commercials and music videos for the likes of Fatboy Slim, Weezer, Daft Punk, and the Breeders, Spike Jonze has honed a quirky visual sensibility that translated almost seamlessly to feature film. But even at his quirkiest, Jonze hasn’t been about quirk for quirk’s sake. His characters—highly emotional robots, dog-headed men with broken legs, tormented puppeteers, enthusiastic amateur dance troops—are underdogs, weirdos, figures on the fringes who make us question what it means to be people: to be lonely, in love, creatively obsessed, and emotionally scrambled…. There is a paradox inherent in Jonze’s films and videos. Their oddball plots and characters cut through the cynical veneer of cool that keeps us from asking hard … Read the rest

Eadweard Muybridge’s Motion Photography Experiments from the 1870s Presented in 93 Animated Gifs

Source:
Open Culture



Excerpt:
“When a horse trots, do all four of its hooves ever leave the ground at once? At one time, we not only had no answer to that question, we had no way of finding out. But in 1872, when the matter piqued the curiosity of Leland Stanford, tycoon, former governor of California, co-founder of Stanford University, and race-horse owner, it did so at just the right time. Having made a bet on the answer, Stanford called on an English photographer named Eadweard Muybridge, known for his work in such then-cutting-edge subfields as time-lapse and stereography, and tasked him with figuring it out. Using a series of cameras activated by trip wires as the horse trotted past, Muybridge proved that … Read the rest

Aristotle’s Aperture: An Animated History of Photography, from the Camera Obscura to the Camera Phone

Source:
Brain Pickings



Excerpt:
“…and how a greedy attitude to intellectual property made the camera’s primary competitor perish. “Needing to have reality confirmed and experience enhanced by photographs is an aesthetic consumerism to which everyone is now addicted,” Susan Sontag wrote in her timeless and increasingly timely treatise on photography a century and a half after the invention of this worldview-changing technology, making a resounding case for what photography can do that the other arts can’t. But how did this relatively nascent art, succeeding cave paintings by millennia, become the dominant visual narrative form of our time? In this short film, the Cooperative of Photography takes us on a five-minute animated gallop through some of the 100 ideas that changed photography, tracing the … Read the rest