The Best Blue Cheese I’ve Ever Had

Part of getting older is a decreasing frequency of new experiences. Thinking about food specifically, when I was 25, I was tasting new things regularly, perhaps once per week or more. But now months or even years can go by without me trying something I’ve never had before. And when I do, the newness is in degree of flavor and experience rather than in it being wholly new.

So it was with great pleasure that I tried Firely Farms’ “Black and Blue” goat blue cheese. It is creamier and far less astringent than any other blue I’ve had, in a category by itself. I have not tried other blue cheeses mad of goat milk, so I can’t say how this compares.

Firely is located in the … Read the rest

Kennett Square Pub Crawl

The first time I was in Kennett, there was one place in town to get a decent beer, Half Moon. Half Moon is now gone, replaced by Grain. Grain also has a location in Newark, DE. The town of Kennett Square is rapidly growing and there are now seven places to get a decent beer, all within a 1-mile walk.

Victory

This is Victory’s 3rd brewpub in the area. They have a lot of beer on tap that they don’t bottle. The bar is very long. There is a full kitchen with good food. They have growler fills and 6-packs for sale, so this can be a good place to finish up if you want more beer to go.

The acoustics are bad and the bar … Read the rest

Brandywine Beer Trail

Here is an ongoing list of breweries and brewpubs in the Brandywine River Valley.

The number of craft beer breweries and brewpubs is growing by the day across the U.S. Pennsylvania, with its strong German heritage (and oldest brewery in the country, Yuengling), is growing as quickly as any other state.

I actually can’t keep up, and every time I go to a beer store, I see brands I had never heard of before. This is resulting in a very regional selection of beer. This is magnified that the preferred style of beer at most brewpubs, hoppy ale, doesn’t maintain freshness well. So drinkers have to go to the source to get the good stuff.… Read the rest

New Cocktail Recipe: The Baltimore

In a normal February, cocktail hour would mean gathering the ingredients for an old fashioned or manhattan, or reaching for a porter or stout. But with the weather as warm as it is, I wanted something more refreshing.

And for beverages,
more acidic = refreshing
– it is the citric acid in lemon and lime juice that make a moscow mule or mojito crisp and satisfying, and the pickle juice in a dirty martini that make you smack your lips.

But it didn’t feel right making a summer drink in the middle of winter, so the question became, how can I make a slightly tart (thus refreshing) beverage without resorting to typical citric-centric recipes?.

I thought back to my recent fascination with switchel and came … Read the rest

Vinegar Lemonade, Switchel, and Posca

It began with me trying to make a whiskey sour, but having no lemon juice. Normally, I would have mixed equal parts lemon (or better, lime) juice and regular sugar until the sugar dissolved, essentially making concentrated lemonade, a.k.a sour mix. Then I would have mixed equal parts of that with tap water, and finally mixed equal parts of that with whiskey and a splash of almond syrup. In other words:

1 part lemon juice
1 part sugar
2 parts water
4 parts whiskey
(optional) splash almond syrup

But, without lemon juice, there was no lemonade. As I poked around the kitchen I saw various half-empty bottles of vinegar – balsamic, red wine, rice, cider, and white. It crossed my mind that I could swap out … Read the rest

Black Tea Port Milk Punch

“adapted from Ruby Punch, a recipe that cocktail historian David Wondrich found in Jerry Thomas’s Bar-Tenders Guide from 1862… features a seriously tasty combination of black tea, ruby port, lemon, and a funky rum-esque liquor called Batavia Arrack. In its original form the tannins from the black tea and port provide grip and add texture, not to mention deep, inky color. After clarifying with milk the result is full bodied, but silky smooth with a rosé-like color and fruitiness.”

http://www.cooksscience.com/recipes/9401-black-tea-port-milk-punch/Read the rest

Craft Distillers Tap Pure Sugar Cane For A Southern Rum Renaissance

Source:
NPR’s The Salt



Excerpt:
“Richland Single Estate Old Georgia Rum is made from cane grown, cut, distilled and rested on the premises of a 100-acre plantation in Richland, Ga. International awards and gold medals have poured in for this field-to-glass rum. Courtesy of Richland Rum Ah, rum, with its legendary pirates bellowing for grog, tiki umbrellas peeking up from neon-colored cocktails, tequila-spiked punch at college parties. Rum, universally imbibed and yet often scorned. Most rum is “the distilled essence of industrial waste,” in the words of Wayne Curtis, author of And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails. That waste is molasses, the byproduct of sugar production. After the molasses has been fermented, flavorings, colorings and … Read the rest

The Biochemist Behind Light Beer, the Greatest Marketing Gimmick the World Has Ever Seen

Source: Atlas Obscura

Excerpt: “When it comes to products we eat or drink, we love our gimmicks. In the past week alone, Crystal Pepsi has returned to the shelves after a 23-year absence and Burger King tried putting a Whopper in a tortilla wrap. Those are great gimmicks that will win some pretty killer business for those brands, despite the likely high calorie counts of each item. (A 20-ounce bottle of Crystal Pepsi has 250 calories. How? It’s clear!) But the greatest gimmick of all time might have been the creation of light beer—a swill that is widely derided by snobs.”

The Biochemist Behind Light Beer, the Greatest Marketing Gimmick the World Has Ever SeenRead the rest

Cold-press Chicory Coffee

When my brother was in Americorps he was stationed for a time in rural Louisiana to help with the aftermath of a hurricane. This was before Katrina. He brought back some cans of chicory coffee, which is a popular tourist item to purchase. The story is that during the Civil War, when the Union Navy had a blockade against the city of New Orleans, regular coffee was very expensive and some resorted to mixing ground, roasted chicory root in with their coffee.

My mother loved the stuff. although I bet she loved the novelty more than the taste. I found the taste of fresh-brewed chicory coffee to be like ‘truck stop coffee’ or ‘4pm office coffee’ – the kind that has been sitting all day on … Read the rest

Po’Daddy Siamese Sandwich

The flavors of southeast Asian cooking, notably dishes such as pad thai (“pad” just means noodles, so “pad thai” just means “Thai-style noodles”) can easily be replicated by combining chili sauce (sriracha in particular, less so the vinegar-heavy tabasco-style sauces in tex-mex cooking) and peanut butter. Add cabbage for texture.

Bread is your choice, but to evoke a banh mi, I’d use a crusty roll if available. Then, just slather in some PB, squirt in some chili sauce and stick a cabbage leaf in the middle. Cheap and above-mediocre… Read the rest

Po’Daddy Rice Cooker Mac and Cheese

In a rice cooker put:

  1. 1 cup dry pasta (elbows are usually cheapest, but shells or ziti or whatever is fine)
  2. 2 cups water
  3. 1 or 2 slices of american cheese. (I’m not a big fan of american cheese,but it melts better than any other kind and if you look at the ingredients, you’ll see that they’re not all garbage. The good kind is just melted colby cheese mixed with milk and then refrigerated. The bad kind has “corn solids” and oils and floor sweepings added.)

Turn it on. The pasta cooks in the water and the water boils away until there is so little left that the pot gets above 212°F (100°C), which signals the cooker to turn off. By then, the cheese is all … Read the rest