The FDA Changes Stop-Smoking Drug’s Label to Include Actual Scientific Evidence

The Food and Drug Administration released a decision Friday to no longer require a black box warning about psychiatric effects on Chantix, a drug meant to help people stop smoking, according to the drug’s manufacturer Pfizer. Though this is a win for Pfizer, it’s also a win for science: years…
Source: Motherboard
The FDA Changes Stop-Smoking Drug’s Label to Include Actual Scientific Evidence

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Startups are now pitching mental wellness like a perk

Focusing on employee well-being is a long-term strategy.

Startup life isn’t for the faint of heart. In venture capitalist Paul Graham’s 2009 blog post, “What startups are really like,” his 19-point checklist includes: startups take over your life, you get no respect, it’s an emotional roller coaster, among other warnings. Sequoia Capital partner Jess Lee once observed that startup founders are always unhappy, for similar reasons.

While those cautions are directed at founders, working for a startup requires its own commitment to the lifestyle—which can take a real toll on one’s well-being. To attract talent, early-stage startups are now differentiating themselves by highlighting mental-wellness as a perk.

Located on South Street in downtown Boston, fashion tech startup Ministry of Supply (aka Ministry) provides the classic offerings of a venture-funded startup: free … Read the rest

200,000 Years of Staggering Human Population Growth Shown in an Animated Map


Last night, during a talk on his new book Raising the Floor, longtime labor leader and current senior fellow at Columbia University Andy Stern told the story of a king and a chessmaster engaged in pitched battle. “If you win,” said the overconfident king, “you may have anything you desire.” Lo, the chessmaster wins the game, but being a humble man asks the king only to provide him with some rice. The king smugly agrees to his eccentric conditions: he must place a grain of rice on the first square of the chessboard, then double the amount of each successive square. Once he reaches the middle, the king stops and has the chessmaster executed. The request would have cost him his entire kingdom and more. … Read the rest

Here’s More Evidence Americans Don’t Know What They Should Be Eating

Source:
Motherboard



Excerpt:
“Are organic foods healthier for you than conventional foods? How about genetically-modified crops? If you’re not totally sure about the answer to these questions, you’re not alone.A new survey from the Pew Research Center shows the US public is very divided on issues of food and nutrition. But if you look at a controversial report—which the British Medical Journal just doubled-down on—on the science behind our nutrition guidelines, it’s not too surprising that none of us seems to know what we ought to be eating. When it comes to organic produce, for example, 55 percent of Americans believe it’s healthier for you, while 41 percent say it’s neither better nor worse than conventional crops, according to the Pew survey, which … Read the rest

New, Genetically-Modified HIV Vaccine Enters Next Phase of Trials

Source:
Motherboard



Excerpt:
“Image: U.S. Army Corps of Engineer/FlickrA new possible HIV vaccine that uses a genetically-modified version of the virus is heading into Phase II trials. The results of an earlier trial showed it provoked an immune response against the virus, but now we need to see if that response is strong enough to protect someone from getting infected with HIV in the first place.The vaccine uses an inactivated—or “dead”—version of the HIV virus, the first vaccine of this type for HIV. Previously, inactivated vaccines haven’t been attempted for HIV because it was considered too risky, but this candidate uses a version of the virus that has been genetically modified—swapping out some of the genes with genetic material from honey bees—to make … Read the rest

How to Navigate the Holidays with a Food Allergy (and Still Eat Deliciously)

Source:
Eating Well Blog



Excerpt:
“Whole roasts with all the trimmings surrounded by mounds of herbed stuffing, creamy green beans covered with crispy onions, baskets of dinner rolls, soft salty butter, savory gravy. This tablescape is all too familiar—the happy tastes and smells of the holiday season. However, since I was diagnosed with celiac disease, that tantalizing tablescape signals caution.”

How to Navigate the Holidays with a Food Allergy (and Still Eat Deliciously)

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What the Sugar Industry Didn't Want Us to Know About Heart Disease

Source:
Eating Well Blog



Excerpt:
“For decades, we considered saturated fat and cholesterol to be the demons in our diets when it came to heart disease. It was the message consistently presented by the American Heart Association (they still recommend limiting saturated fat). And it’s what the science pointed us to believe: cut down on saturated fat because it’s linked to an increased risk of heart disease. So what did we do? Replaced bacon with muffins, chose sugary cereals over buttered toast and eggs, and almost always went for the low-fat option—which usually meant more sugar in our diets.”

What the Sugar Industry Didn’t Want Us to Know About Heart Disease

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How to Fuel Up Naturally for Your Active Lifestyle

Source:
Eating Well Blog



Excerpt:
“Despite the fact that most of us aren’t professional athletes, it’s still a good idea to fuel your body when you’re active. Buying sports drinks, gummies, gels and bars can get expensive—not to mention, they can have some questionable ingredients. So it’s a good thing recent studies have shown that foods you probably already have in your pantry can work just as well. Whether you’re training for a marathon or just lacing up for the first time, here are some simple sports nutrition tips on how you can feed your inner athlete naturally.”

How to Fuel Up Naturally for Your Active Lifestyle

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This Little Silver Cube Could Be the Future of Personal DNA Testing

Source:
Motherboard

Excerpt:
“Paul Lem and the Spartan Cube. Image: Alexander CollierIf Apple made a personal DNA testing product, it might look something like the Spartan Cube: A minimalist, anodized aluminum box, about the size of a large coffee mug, and roughly as heavy as a small laptop. Aside from the logo of Spartan Bioscience, the Canadian company behind it, there’s nothing much that tells you what it can do. But this unassuming device holds within it a bona fide revolution—at least, according to the medical doctor behind its design. Or, if you’re a cynic, it’s a Pandora’s box.I recently drove out to the Ottawa suburbs to pay a visit to the offices of Paul Lem, founder and CEO of Spartan Bioscience, and his team of … Read the rest

Mental Health, Free Will, and Your Microbiome

Source:
Brain Pickings

Excerpt:
““We are legion, each and every one of us. Always a ‘we’ and never a ‘me.’” “I have observed many tiny animals with great admiration,” Galileo marveled as he peered through his microscope — a tool that, like the telescope, he didn’t invent himself but he used with in such a visionary way as to render it revolutionary. The revelatory discoveries he made in the universe within the cell are increasingly proving to be as significant as his telescopic discoveries in the universe without — a significance humanity has been even slower and more reluctant to accept than his radical revision of the cosmos. That multilayered significance is what English science writer and microbiology elucidator Ed Yong explores in I Contain … Read the rest