Tag Archives: How to start a subculture

The Disappearing Membership Cafés of Provence

The Disappearing Membership Cafés of Provence

The village of Gordes in Provence is one of the most beautiful & charming in a part of France that’s teeming with small towns that are … well, beautiful and charming. Perched high on the slopes of the Monts de Vaucluse, Gordes is a treasure trove of narrow, winding cobbled streets, crammed with old homes that cling to the mountainside, and lead up to an old medieval castle. But in one corner of this magical village overlooking the Calavon Valley is a tiny bar that’s one of the last of its kind in France– the Cercle Republicain! The what now?… Read the rest

Amsterdam is Turning its Bridge Houses into Tiny Hotels

Amsterdam is Turning its Bridge Houses into Tiny Hotels

© Mirjam Bleeker, courtesy of SWEETS hotel

Well that’s it for me. I’ll never stay in a normal hotel in Amsterdam again now that 28 of the city’s bridge houses have been transformed into charming little hotel rooms. For over a century, these canalside gate houses accommodated the storied bridge keepers whose task it was to conduct the city’s water traffic and allow boats to pass.Read the rest

French No Man’s Land looking Suspiciously Like a Wes Anderson Film Set

French No Man’s Land looking Suspiciously Like a Wes Anderson Film Set

Staring out of the passenger seat window on car journeys through France, I’ve always found the roadscape of highways strangely alluring ever since I was a small child. What lives at the side of the road in a no man’s land of concrete and abandon are often ignored and very rarely the subject of artistic interest. French photographer Read the rest

Morse Code Mine Dancing: A Language Born in the Darkness

Morse Code Mine Dancing: A Language Born in the Darkness

Born in the darkness of South African gold mines during Apartheid, “gumboot dancing” sprung from the basic need for exploited miners to communicate in what was a harrowing environment, where they were forbidden to even speak to one another. Workers decided to let their boots do the talking for them, and developed a kind of “morse code” from the noises made by the stomping of their rubber “Gumboots” or “Wellingtons.”  What became their form of communication in the underground took “body language” to whole new level and inspired an entirely new form of dance…

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