Tag Archives: Prehistoric

Paracas Candelabra of Peru

The Nazca Lines in southern Peru are some of the best known geoglyphs on earth, but they aren’t the only ones in the Nazca desert. About 200 kilometers north west of Nazca is another isolated and somewhat less popular geoglyph called Paracas Candelabra. It is also known as the “Candelabra of the Andes” because of its resemblance to a three-branched candlestick.

The geoglyph is etched on the sloping face of a hill at Pisco Bay on the Peruvian coast. The design has been cut into the soil to a depth of two feet with stones, possibly from a later date, placed around it. The figure is 181 meters tall, large enough to be seen as far as twenty kilometers out at sea.

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Photo credit: Unukorno/Wikimedia

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Grime’s Graves: A Neolithic Flint Mine

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This strange lunar-like landscape in the middle of Thetford Forest in Norfolk, England, looks very similar to mortar craters in Normandy and in Somme from the First World War. But these ones in Norfolk have a different origin, and despite their name, they are not graves. Grime's Graves is actually a large flint mining complex from the Neolithic age that’s at least 4,500 years old.

In the Neolithic era, flint —a hard, mineralized form of quartz—was a valuable natural resource and highly prized because of its tendency to break into thin flakes with a razor sharp edge that was very useful to make tools and weapons. Indeed, flint remained in use for many centuries even after men learned to make tools out of metals.

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