What If Everyone Ate Beans Instead of Beef?

In America, beef accounts for 37 percent of all human-induced methane released into the air. Methane is 23 times as warming to the climate as carbon dioxide. In a recent article, Atlantic senior editor James Hamblin highlighted research that found one dietary change—replacing beef with beans—could get the U.S. as much as 74 percent of the way to meeting 2020 greenhouse-gas emission goals. As Hamblin notes, it’s worth being reminded that individual choices matter.… Read the rest

In shift towards electric vehicles, Volkswagen looking for cobalt contracts

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Volkswagen is looking for serious, long-term contracts with cobalt producers, according to a Reuters report on Friday. Cobalt is a common component in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries, and it’s projected to command more and more demand as electric vehicles are adopted in greater numbers. Currently cobalt is trading at about $26 per pound.

Securing reserves of the kinds of materials used in batteries will be key to Volkswagen’s future growth. After the so-called “dieselgate” scandal of 2015, Volkswagen Group pledged to pivot away from diesel to electric vehicles (EVs). The German automaker has said it wants to produce up to 3 million electric vehicles by 2025 and offer 80 electric vehicle models across all 12 brands by 2030. If

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Microscopic and in motion

Nikon, one of the leading manufacturers of microscopes, also hosts an annual microscopy competition (and you can use any company’s microscopes to enter). We’ve shared some of our favorite images with you in years past, since they’ve been every bit as artistic as good photography and, in many cases, reveal important details about the natural world—details that we’d otherwise never be able to appreciate.

Most people will only get exposed to microscopy during high school biology, which is typically the realm of static slices of long-dead organisms, permanently pressed onto a glass side. But history’s first use of a microscope back in the 1600s involved watching living microbes flitting across the field of view. Microscopy doesn’t have to be static; in fact, the element of time

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