Tag Archives: society

Why is Water Pouring Out of This Tree in Montenegro?

The Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty recently shared a video about a unique natural phenomenon in a village called Dinoša, located in southeastern Montenegro—a small country on the Adriatic coast. There is a mulberry tree standing in the meadow there that turns into a fountain whenever it rains heavy. From a hollow on the tree trunk water can be seen gushing abundantly.

Apparently, the rains had flooded the underground springs and the additional pressure created pushed water up the tree trunk through cracks or hollows on the trunk, until it poured out of a hole a few feet above the ground. As you can see from the video, the ground is quite sloppy indicating the amount of groundwater there is in the soil and below. You can … Read the rest

Alexander Fleming’s Microbial Art

Alexander Fleming is widely known as the brilliant microbiologist who gave the world the miraculous life-saving drug called antibiotic. But he also had an artistic side that is perhaps less well known. Fleming was a member of London’s Chelsea Arts Club, where he tried his hand at watercolor and created compositions that were amateurish at best. But his artistic talents didn’t lie in watercolors or pencil sketches but in another medium—living organism.

Fleming was one of the first scientists to use microbes to create works of art. He painted ballerinas, houses, soldiers, mothers feeding children, stick figures fighting and many other scenes on petri dishes using microbes. Fleming produced these artwork by culturing microorganisms having different natural pigments on petri dishes to create colorful patterns. He … Read the rest

Striking snapshots of 1970’s New York

In 1970, Daniel Patrick Moynihan convinced the Nixon White House to support a policy of “benign neglect,” wherein basic government services were systemically denied to cities across the United States with large African-American and Latinx populations.

New York City quickly became the nation’s most famous victim of “urban blight” at the hands of the state. The city teetered on the edge of bankruptcy as manufacturers fled en masse, while landlords hired arsonists to torch their buildings knowing they could get more money from insurance than they could from resale. The city fell into desolate and desperate straits. Yet within this horrific landscape, New York maintained its dignity and strength, becoming the site for the most explosive cultural movements of the late 20th century.

The city’s landmark … Read the rest

Portraits of the East’s monks, pilgrims & wanderers

First published back in 2011, Steve McCurry’s Looking East is a breathtaking showcase of the photographer’s best portrait work. The images, which were shot during his extensive travels across Southeast Asia, focus on the region’s outsiders: from monks and children to pilgrims, wanderers and migrants.

Like much of McCurry’s work, the collection teeters between the edges of cutting-edge photojournalism and fine art – presenting people from all walks of life in a beautifully unified way, and breaking the boundaries between race, language and culture.

Now, the book is making a return, with Phaidon opting to publish it in paperback for the first time this week. “[Looking East is] regarded as one of the most iconic publications of contemporary documentary photography,” a spokesperson said of the … Read the rest

The complicated relationship between food & race in the UK

There’s no doubt that the food industry has a complicated relationship with race. Staples in kids of immigrants’ diets growing up in the West – like kimchi, turmeric and medjool dates – were once derided for being strange in school canteens. Yet now, they’ve been repackaged as trendy superfoods for the masses.

While foods that PoC once hid or swapped in favour of ‘acceptable’ Western dishes have now become wellness buzzwords, PoC still remain sidelined from the mainstream food industry. In one round-up of the most significant food books published in 2017, not one featured a non-white author. Meanwhile, back in 2015, people of colour were found to be paid 56 per cent less than their white counterparts in the U.S. restaurant industry.

The … Read the rest

Hattie Collins talks 15 years of following grime

Few know grime like Hattie Collins.

The journalist and author has been there since the first wave, covering the rise of Wiley, Dizzee Rascal et al at the turn of the millennium as its certified documenter-in-chief.

Over the past few years, as mainstream circles have fought to embrace Skepta and the likes, she’s remained one of its most trusted sources. Her 2016 book, This Is Grime, is the definitive text when it comes to chronicling the culture’s rise and rise.

In the latest episode of Joining the Dots with Don Letts, a new podcast from Spaces In-BetweenCollins sits down with the Rebel Dread to discuss a career spent following grime. Covering everything from the early raves to Boy Better Know’s takeover … Read the rest

Could the sea be destroying surfer’s immune systems?

In a day spent out on the waves, it’s nearly impossible not to swallow a mouthful of water – and while these salty gulps aren’t going to kill you, they may be laden with more than meets the eye. According to worrying new research, surfers are three times more likely to host antibiotic resistant bacteria in their guts than non-surfers, leaving them more susceptible to diseases that can no longer be treated with antibiotics.

Since they were first discovered in 1928, antibiotics have been used to kill bacterial infections like pneumonia, tuberculosis and other fatal diseases. Unfortunately, though, bacteria are highly adaptable, and can quickly develop immunities. The widespread use of antibiotics in medicine today worries the World Health Organisation and the UN environmental assembly, who … Read the rest

Rat King: The Mysterious Conjoined Creature

On a cold January morning in 2005, in the village of Saru in southern Estonia, farmer Rein Kıiv and his son made a curious discovery. On the sandy floor of their shed, they found a cluster of 16 rats with their tails inexplicably tangled into a knot. The rats were squeaking and struggling to escape but the harder they pulled the tighter the knot became. The animals were apparently trying to dig themselves out of a narrow burrow but in the struggle some of them got buried under the sand. Seven of the rats in the tangle were already dead. Rein’s son decided to put the diabolic little scene to an end, and picking up a stick, killed the rest of the wretched animals.

Rein Kıiv … Read the rest

Neville Southall tackles… Britain’s immigration system

Imagine looking out of your window and seeing bombs falling all around you. You have a wife and three children, and the war has been raging for months. There is hardly any food or water, and if you stay it is only a matter of time before one of you might be killed. What should you do: stay and risk death or move on away from the war torn areas? I think most people, including you or I, would opt to move on. But where do you move to? The next town? The next city? The next country?

War, famine, disaster, prejudice has devastated your home country – your house will be ransacked and occupied by others, you will be attacked, hungry or lose everything. The … Read the rest

Anthony Van Engelen: ‘I still feel my best when I skate’

It’s 9am in Huntington Beach, California and Anthony Van Engelen is wide awake. “I’m usually up really early,” he explains. “I guess it just happened when I got older – and sober.”

For AVE, it’s certainly been quite the ride. Since turning pro back in 1999, the 39-year-old San Diegan has carved a space as one of skating’s most instantly recognisable figures. With his raw, unfiltered style and relentless, no bullshit approach, the 2015 Thrasher Skater of the Year is, to put it bluntly, one of the best.

As a face of Vans since 2005, you can catch him – along with the rest of their pro skate team – in the new Versa Hoodie DX. Pro-built for skateboarders, the heavyweight garment employs critical … Read the rest