Tag Archives: Sweden

The Disgusting Food Museum

A new museum aimed to assault the olfactory senses of visitors and churn their stomach opened yesterday in Sweden’s third largest city, Malmo. Inside are various exhibits that some cultures supposedly eat, such as fermented shark meat, bull penis, fermented herring, maggot cheese and ant larvae. It’s so bad that the museum provide visitors with vomit bags before they enter.

“I want people to question what they find disgusting and realize that disgust is always in the eye of the beholder,” said Samuel West, the founder of the Disgusting Food Museum, who is also known for the Museum of Failure. “We usually find things we're not familiar with disgusting, versus things that we grow up with and are familiar with are not disgusting, regardless of … Read the rest

The Wreck of Swedish Warship Mars

About 18 km off the coast the Swedish island of Öland, in the Baltic Sea, at a depth of about 75 meters, lies one of the most beautiful shipwrecks. The low level of sediments, slow currents, brackish water, and the absence of a wood-eating worms have kept the wreck of the 16th century warship “Mars” in a remarkable condition.

Named after the Roman god of war, Mars was one of the largest battleships in the world when it was built, even larger than the famous Swedish ship Vasa. The ship was commissioned by the King of Sweden, Erik XIV, in 1563. With a length of 48 meters, and 107 guns on board, it was the leading ship of Sweden's fleet, until it was sunk during … Read the rest

The Mysterious Gotland Grooves

Scattered throughout the island of Gotland, in the middle of the Baltic Sea, are thousands of stones with strange grooves or furrows cut into its smooth, hard surface. The grooves always occur in groups, cut side by side and are of varying length, width and depth.

At first glance, it appears as if someone had been sharpening their axes or swords on them. That was the general opinion when the grooves were widely reported in the mid-19th century. Consequently, the grooves were called "sharpening stones". But soon scholars began to have doubts about their origin, since the shape and size of the grooves made them unfit for sharpening swords. Someone pointed out that stone-age swords, and even those from the Middle Ages and Viking Age, were … Read the rest