Who’s Afraid of Adolf Wölfli?

Who’s Afraid of Adolf Wölfli?

Some artists leave us tangled legacies– reputations tied up in creative theft, family feuds and unresolved estates. Others, like Adolf Wölfli, leave us a veritable Pandora’s Box for consideration. At a glance, Wölfli’s work oozes the sentiments of Psychedelic art; its kaleidoscopic swirls of colour look fresh off the Haight Ashbury, circa 1967. In truth, they’re the relics of a man orphaned in the 1800s, whose life was bookended by the abuse he both received and committed, and whose days were spent incarcerated at a Swiss mental hospital with schizophrenia.

A Bewitching Compendium of Victorians Letting their Hair Down

A Bewitching Compendium of Victorians Letting their Hair Down

There was one fairytale character in particular that seemed to leave an impression on the ladies of the Victorian era. Rapunzel was originally written in 1790 by Friedrich Schulz and retold by the Brothers Grimm in 1812. The story was told during the Georgian era where long, loose straggling locks were unheard of and ringlets in a poodle-like up-do was all the rage. It was only during the Victorian times that the ladies really let down their hair…

All Aboard the 1970s Sex Raft Experiment: the Best Reality TV Show That Never Was

All Aboard the 1970s Sex Raft Experiment: the Best Reality TV Show That Never Was

Fasad Productions

Five men, six women and one 101-day, sex-starved ocean adventure. Has a catchy ring to it, no? “It was a fabulous adventure story,” said Marcus Lindeen, director of a 2018 documentary called The Raft that chronicles 1973’s “Acali Experiment,” in which an eclectic group set sail to find out if the best– or worst– of humankind rears its head in isolation.

The Playmobil Boat Sailing 3,000 Miles Across the World

The Playmobil Boat Sailing 3,000 Miles Across the World

The Transgender French Spy History Forgot

The Transgender French Spy History Forgot

The Chevalier d’Eon knew how to turn heads. She was charming to boot, and an unmatched swordfighter; an impeccable spy for the French government, and capable of dazzling the Empress of Russia. Above all, she found the courage to publically affirm her identity as a transgender woman ­— an especially intimidating task in 18th century.

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She Taught Amelia Earhart to Fly

She Taught Amelia Earhart to Fly

Without Neta Snook, there may never have been an Amelia Earhart. “The Lone Aviatrix” of Iowa had been shattering the proverbial glass ceiling with her plane long before the Earhart took to the skies, and she did it in a plane she assembled in her parents’ backyard. In other words, Snook was the kind of woman who saw what she wanted, and didn’t just ask for it — she built it with her own two hands.

Burning iPhones and Designer Bags on China’s Day of the Dead

Burning iPhones and Designer Bags on China’s Day of the Dead

Kim Jong-un Married One of His Cheerleaders

Kim Jong-un Married One of His Cheerleaders

They Built a Life-Sized Stunt Double of Paris

They Built a Life-Sized Stunt Double of Paris

Remember when French authorities built a miniature version of Paris  to save the city from Nazi bomb-fire?

Sweetheart Lingerie of World War II

Sweetheart Lingerie of World War II

Valentine’s Day is just around the bend, which means you’ve got a great excuse to indulge in some treat-yo-self extravagances (i.e. chocolate, fancy undies, more chocolate). First up on our shopping list?