Tag Archives: cooking

Swing-A-Way Can Opener

We have gone through so many can openers in the last few years. Each time we buy one, it stops working after just a few cans. Either the gears stop meshing or the handle disconnects from the axle that turns the gear.

We kept trying different, ever-more- expensive brands until we finally found a winner. The Swing-A-Way has worked very well and doesn’t have the problems all the others had.

According to this review of can openers:

John J. Steuby Sr. told us that prior to manufacturing the EZ-Duz-It, his company made hardware for the Swing-A-Way can opener for 30 years. (Steuby stopped making parts for Swing-A-Way after that company was sold a couple of times and moved production to China in 2008.) According to Steuby, to create the EZ-Duz-It, his company made several improvements to the Swing-A-Way model, including making the handle ¼ inch longer. Our testers liked the smoothly spinning knob on the EZ-Duz-It, which provided excellent leverage and required less effort to turn compared with the OXO openers we tried.

Lunch at the Forgotten Rothschild Party Palace

Lunch at the Forgotten Rothschild Party Palace

© MessyNessyChic

I stood looking up at the gates, hands on my hips, wondering what forgotten chateau I’d stumbled upon this time. We’d taken a detour to avoid the traffic back into Paris and suddenly pulled over into the ditch by the side of the road at my absolute insistence. What I didn’t know then, peeping through the iron bars, was that I was standing at the back entrance of the largest and most luxurious 19th-century château in France.

Make and Read Turkish Coffee

Sema Bal, a Turkish Coffee Messenger, brings her talents to the MUNCHIES Test Kitchen. Through the art of reading coffee grounds, Sema can read past, present and future fortunes. You know what the first step to a good reading is? Good turkish coffee. Sema shows us how to make the perfect cup of creamy turkish coffee and also does a reading on MUNCHIES host Charlet Duboc.

In the Field: Caleb Harper, Director, MIT Open Agriculture Initiative

On a freezing December morning, I visited the Open Agriculture Initiative at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab, and talked with Director Caleb Harper. Harper and his team aim to reinvent the future of farming, both locally and globally. Their work features open-source Food Computers, which are enclosed containers for…
Source: Cook’s Science
In the Field: Caleb Harper, Director, MIT Open Agriculture Initiative

The Key to Crystal-Clear Cocktails? Milk. (Really.)


After a 150-year absence, milk punch is back. Newly popular with the mixology set, this drink is more a technique than a particular recipe, much as punch is a format rather than a formula. Today’s bartenders are not only experimenting with the range of ingredients that go into the cocktail, they are also experimenting with the technique itself. To understand more about the drink, how it’s changing, and how to create a great recipe for the home bartender, we hit the bar scene—and spoke with as many professional milk-punch makers as we could. There are two kinds of milk punch. The first, typically called brandy milk punch or bourbon milk punch, is popular in New Orleans, is citrus-free, and includes milk. The second type, often called…

Source: Cook’s Science

The Key to Crystal-Clear Cocktails? Milk. (Really.)

In the Field: Dr. Brian Wansink, founder of the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University


I recently sat down to chat with behavioral scientist Dr. Brian Wansink, who is the author of Mindless Eating (2006) and Slim by Design (2014) and founder of the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University. The Food and Brand Lab was started in 1997 at the University of Illinois (before moving to Cornell in 2005), with the desire to “discover how humans relate to food with the end goal of uncovering solutions to improve eating environments and help individuals eat better.” Wansink analyzes why we eat what we eat and uses his findings to help both consumers and companies make healthier choices. Cook’s Science: How did you get inspired to research food and how we decide to eat? Dr. Brian Wansink: I grew up in the least cool…
Source: Cook’s Science

In the Field: Dr. Brian Wansink, founder of the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University

Which Burger is Better?


Maybe your burger is born on Sweet Ranches, 45 minutes outside of San Francisco, just in time for fall rains to turn the fields green. At the ranch, on the edge of the San Francisco Bay, Darrel Sweet breeds calves that he’ll eventually sell to Harris Ranch, a commercial feedlot in Coalinga, California, where they’ll finish their lives eating corn and silage, the way all grain-fed cows do. Or maybe your burger is born the previous spring, two hours north, on SunFed Ranch in the foothills of Modoc County, where Matt Byrne’s family has been ranching since the 1870s. Until about 10 years ago, these cows were likewise finished on grain. But now they are grass-fed from birth until death, meaning it takes them longer to…
Source: Cook’s Science

Which Burger is Better?

UPDATE—E(gg)xamaning Eggplant


It’s no secret that here at Cook’s Science we appreciate a good deep dive—our recently published book is basically an homage to the practice. We spend a lot of our time digging in on certain topics, sometimes by accident, like when I recently responded to a question about substituting canned for frozen corn and ended up watching YouTube videos about the production of canned corn for hours. (They were surprisingly riveting.) Most of the time, though, our research is of the focused and intentional variety, and we thought it would be fun to do a series of deep dives into individual ingredients for Cook’s Science. For these, we would develop a handful of recipes that focus on one ingredient but vary in cooking technique, flavor profile,…
Source: Cook’s Science

UPDATE—E(gg)xamaning Eggplant